Parade Ground rubble life.

There are many sea birds that call Alcatraz home. Western Gulls make up the majority of the birds with around 2000 nesting on the parade ground at the south end of the island. The parade ground will be closing to allow these birds to raise their young on February 1st to mid September.

During the penitentiary days, families of the guards also called the parade ground home. Many of the families lived in apartment buildings and tended gardens. The apartments were torn down by the government after the island was occupied by the Native Americans from 1969 to 1971 and the rubble was left.

Chasmanthe growing in the ruins. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

From the remaining ruins, new life does spring. Like elsewhere on the island, the neglected gardens were overrun with aggressive ivy, honeysuckle and blackberries. The tough conditions on the parade ground allow for only the most determined plants to survive.

Aeoniums on foundation wall. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Taking a walk around the rubble piles, it is hard not to be impressed with how the Aeoniums have found niches for themselves. Spilling over concrete walls, these plants are thriving without soil, no summer water and very windy conditions.

Aeoniums growing from rubble pile. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The photo opportunities alone warrant a visit to the island before this intriguing part of the island closes until September.

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One Response to Parade Ground rubble life.

  1. Stunning shot of the Chasmanthe and the Ruins. I love the hazy silhouettes of the yucca spikes out of the top of the Warden’s house!