Popping Poppies

Spring is by far the best time of year to see the gardens, the island is brilliant with color and most visitors are surprised by this unexpected beauty.

 

Right now we have four

The California poppy blooming brightly with the prison in the background. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The California poppy blooming brightly with the prison in the background. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

kinds of poppies profusely blooming. The state flower, the California poppy, Eschscholzia californica, seem to spread every year, and the bright orange almost glows on a foggy day.

 

 

 

It is thought that the original seeds came in with imported soil with the military in the mid-1850s. A few of the poppies in the Rose Terrace garden are a soft buttercup yellow.

 

The Shirley poppies, Papaver rhoeas,  are looking great again this year. We grow these from seed every year and always end up with a wide variation in pinks and reds. The Shirley poppies were introduced to the island in 1924 by the California Wildflower and Spring Blossom Society as part of a beautification effort. In the early 1920s, it seems that the town of San Francisco

Shirley poppies in Officers' Row gardens. Photo by Al Healy.

Shirley poppies in Officers’ Row gardens. Photo by Al Healy.

was not too happy with the appearance of the military prison in the middle of their beautiful Bay. Military inmates were enlisted to plant the slopes  in an effort to create a cheerful face for the town.

 

This year, we planted a few Iceland poppies, Papaver nudicaule. These are the bright orange and yellow flowers that are typically seen in early spring.

 

 

 

 

An annual poppy that we tried this year is Papaver ‘Danebrog’. The results so far are quite impressive! A brilliant red with white splotches on the outside of the petals, the plant has reached a height of 4’ so far.

 

An annual poppy in the Prisoner Gardens. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

An annual poppy in the Prisoner Gardens. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Our last poppy is another ‘stop and notice me’ plant. The fried egg looking blossoms of the Matilija poppy, Romneya coulteri, look like they are made from tissue paper. The delicate looking blooms sit at the end of thorny stems of a rather tall shrub. This California native was tough to get started but it is now fully established and is loving its location in the Prisoner Gardens.

Matilija poppy flower looks just like a fried egg. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Matilija poppy flower looks just like a fried egg. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

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