A New Garden Star

On our shopping trip to Annie’s Annuals this past December we picked up a number of plants that would give the gardens plenty of blooms during the dry months of summer and into the fall. Scanning Annie’s website before we ventured out, we made our shopping list for plants that had the look of the 1940s and 1950s but that would also tolerate dry conditions and not be fussy about the soil.

 

We happened upon Tanacetum niveum ‘White Bouquet Tansy’. I think gardeners are, by nature, hopeful people – who else trusts that burying tiny seeds in the ground will bring forth in a few months times, overflowing beds of color? That is exactly what happened with our little 4” pot of Tanacetum. An unassuming clump of green leaves is now a two foot mound of daisy flowers.

 

Tanacetum niveum "White Bouquet Tansy"

Tanacetum niveum
“White Bouquet Tansy”

The daisy flowers echo the historic photo we have of the Prisoner Gardens along the roadway. We had tried Shasta daisy and white coneflower, but neither of these plants did very well. The Tanacetum is proving to be a winner!

 

Tanacetum niveum "White Bouquet Tansy"  with marigolds. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Tanacetum niveum
“White Bouquet Tansy” with marigolds. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The yellow centers complement the yellow marigolds and coreopsis growing next to them.

 

Tanacetum niveum "White Bouquet Tansy"  with coreopsis

Tanacetum niveum
“White Bouquet Tansy” with coreopsis

Annie describes this hardy perennial from Central South-Eastern Europe as indestructible, deer resistant, requires average to low water, self-sowing and needs full sun. We can also add ‘seagull proof’ and tolerates coastal conditions. After blooming is finished, it is recommended to cut the plant back to 3” for a second bloom. The Tanacetum is at home from USDA zones 4 to 10 – a very wide range!

 

I’m curious to see just how tough this plant is to not only see how long it will bloom for, but how the Bay’s  wind and fog treat it during the summer months.

This entry was posted in Plants, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.