Monthly Archives: December 2013

The Toolshed Terraces Receive their Deserved Attention

 

 

Our winter renovation projects are moving right along even though we are still waiting for rain.

 

The toolshed terraces have never really

Out of season. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Out of season. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

been overhauled in the years of the garden restoration project, other than the removal of forty years of overgrowth to allow the survivor plants some breathing room.

 

The terraces were built by the inmates of the Federal prison in the early 1940s and was tended up until 1963 when the prison closed. The Mediterranean plants, such as Chasmanthe, Echium, Aeonium, artichokes and Sedum praealtum have thrived, plus the tough Rose ‘Felicite et Perpetue’ is still holding its own. The majority of these plants put on a great spring show but by July, the garden is looking like the ugly duckling with no hint of really how pretty it is.

 

Other than needing plants to bloom throughout the year that will tolerate the dry, windy slope, we needed two main ingredients – better soil and an irrigation system.

 

Fresh compost ready to be mixed into the beds.

Fresh compost ready to be mixed into the beds.

Normally, bringing in supplies to the island is a chore, but luckily, our compost pile provides rich compost. We did purchase chicken manure that was brought out on the monthly barge. We installed drip line irrigation so we will not have to wrangle the hose up and down the fragile terraces. Even though all of our chosen plants are drought tolerant, the plants will do better with weekly deep watering.

 

The succulents growing across the road provided inspiration for the corner of the terraces. We had Dudleya, Echeveria and Aeonium cuneatum on the island already from a planting project this past spring. The seagulls took a liking to the plants and we ended up rescuing the plants and placing them in the greenhouse to nurse them back to life. Let’s hope the seagulls leave them alone in this garden! A few larger Agave attenuata were planted as well to tie in with the established Agave.

 

Most of the succulents we propagated ourselves from island stock. Photo by  Shelagh Fritz

Most of the succulents we propagated ourselves from island stock. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

We had taken cuttings of the Crassula ovata and these propagations were planted on lower terraces to carryon the block of plantings.

 

We also added Fremontodendron californicum (flannel bush) to this garden. And an interesting fact – this is the last plant that we needed back on the island from the plant lists that were mentioned in the 1996 book The Gardens of Alcatraz.

Karolina bringing our purchased plants from the Alcatraz dock to the work site. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Karolina bringing our purchased plants from the Alcatraz dock to the work site. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

 

The Leonotis leonurus, lion’s tail, that was planted in the lawn borders have been receiving a hugs amount of attention, and so we added in more on the terraces to give a punch of orange throughout the summer and fall. Purple Limonium perezii were added in as well, as they are great for seaside conditions.

 

We wanted to add a bit more red and purple so we introduced Asclepias curassavica and purple trailing Lantana to the mix.

 

One thing that needs to be finished yet it to divide the surviving bearded iris! They don’t ever seem to slow down.

 

With the fence removed, visitors are now strolling past this garden to get a better look I can’t wait to see how the garden will only get better.

Posted in Gardens of Alcatraz, Inmate Gardeners, Plants, Rehabilitation | Comments Off on The Toolshed Terraces Receive their Deserved Attention

Get Back in Line!

As the end of December approaches and we get into the depths of winter (California winter, of course), we are busy with our planting projects in the gardens.

 

High on the ‘to-do’ list was to replant a terraced garden in Officers’ Row, the eastern facing gardens. These gardens were first rehabilitated in 2006 and looked fantastic for the first 8 years, but had noticeably declined this past summer. This garden is open every Wednesday for our casual garden viewing with a gardener present so it was vital that our showcase garden impressed our visitors.

 

The gardens were designed by the late Carola Ashford, the first project manager, to resemble the cutting flower gardens created by the wives of the federal penitentiary during the 1940s and 1950s. She selected perennials and bulbs that would give year-round color based on a few key photographs.

 

The historic photo showing red and yellow cutting flowers. Photo courtesy of J. Babyak

The historic photo showing red and yellow cutting flowers. Photo courtesy of J. Babyak

In the photos, reds and yellows are predominant, so Gaillardia ‘Burgandy’ and ‘Goblin’ were selected to give the cheerful look. Yellow Aurinia saxatilis, gold basket, was chosen to edge the pathway mixed in with blue Muscari, grape hyacinth, for a spring mix. Heirloom daffodils were planted in rows to bloom successively through the spring months. As the garden matured, many of the neat planting rows were beginning to meander, and the perennials were not blooming as fiercely as they once had.

 

While we could have gone back to Carola’s original planting plan and done the same, this was an opportunity to introduce a few new plants to Alcatraz that provided the look we were after.

 

The first step was to supplement the soil with rich compost from our own pile and chicken manure that we had purchased. The sparrows had a field day scurrying around after insects.

 

A sparrow watching our every move. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

A sparrow watching our every move. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The burgundy gaillardia was replaced with Coreopsis tinctoria ‘Tiger Stripes’ that has a brilliant mix of red and yellow on each flower. This is a very forgiving perennial that also makes a great cut flower, plus it is also an heirloom plant, first introduced in 1885. We did keep the Gaillardia ‘Goblin’ but needed to transplant a few of the plants to keep the orderly lines of cut flowers.

 

We have become big fans of Coreopsis!

Coreopsis grandiflora 'Sunburst'. Photo courtesty of Annie's Annuals

Coreopsis grandiflora ‘Sunburst’. Photo courtesty of Annie’s Annuals

We also introduced Coreopsis grandiflora ‘Sunburst’. This is a great bloomer with golden flowers. The coreopsis does perform better when regularly deadheaded but this garden task is very meditative.

 

We had also noted that the garden was lacking in fall blooms – we would always make an emergency trip to the local nursery for some fall plants to fill in the blanks when the iris and dahlias had died back. This past fall we purchased Rudbeckia, black eyed Susan, to give us the extra color we needed, and they were very happy on the island. So happy that they spread! Not a lot, but they were wandering. We never had the heart to weed out the strays, and the neat lines of a cutting garden were beginning to be lost.

 

The bearded iris also needed rethinking. This was a difficult one, as they are legacy plants to the gardens. Mostly blooming in spring, the large section of iris would remain barren and become a chore to nip the brown leaf tips throughout the rest of the year. We dug up the entire patch (and hopefully got rid of some nasty grass with long rhizomes as well) and tucked a single row of iris between the gaillardia and the coreopsis. The iris blooms should rise above its neighbors and then we can cut the foliage back to be hidden by the other perennials.

 

Placing all the plants first and then planting really helps to see what the garden will look like; and lets you make any changes before you actually plant. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Placing all the plants first and then planting really helps to see what the garden will look like; and lets you make any changes before you actually plant. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

We also added in a few missing plants – a couple of Limonium perezii (statice), penstemon (beard tongue), and centranthus (Jupiter’s Beard). With Centranthus being a notable naturalizer, I refused to buy one. Ironically, we had to hunt around for a seedling of a red centranthus, the gardeners do a great job of removing them.

 

The daffodils remain to be tackled though. This will need to be done in the spring when we can identify each flower. The dahlias and the daffodils are inter-planted as they bloom at different times of the year. Unfortunately, with constant digging in this bed, the neat rows of heirloom daffodils have become interspersed with each other. The daffodils will need dividing anyway, as they have formed big clumps that are forcing themselves out of the ground.

 

All done! Photo by Shelagh Fritz

All done! Photo by Shelagh Fritz

All in all, it was a great week to be in the gardens. Now we just need some rain.

Posted in Gardens of Alcatraz, Plants, Rehabilitation | Comments Off on Get Back in Line!