Author Archives: Shelagh Fritz

Popping Poppies

Spring is by far the best time of year to see the gardens, the island is brilliant with color and most visitors are surprised by this unexpected beauty.

 

Right now we have four

The California poppy blooming brightly with the prison in the background. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The California poppy blooming brightly with the prison in the background. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

kinds of poppies profusely blooming. The state flower, the California poppy, Eschscholzia californica, seem to spread every year, and the bright orange almost glows on a foggy day.

 

 

 

It is thought that the original seeds came in with imported soil with the military in the mid-1850s. A few of the poppies in the Rose Terrace garden are a soft buttercup yellow.

 

The Shirley poppies, Papaver rhoeas,  are looking great again this year. We grow these from seed every year and always end up with a wide variation in pinks and reds. The Shirley poppies were introduced to the island in 1924 by the California Wildflower and Spring Blossom Society as part of a beautification effort. In the early 1920s, it seems that the town of San Francisco

Shirley poppies in Officers' Row gardens. Photo by Al Healy.

Shirley poppies in Officers’ Row gardens. Photo by Al Healy.

was not too happy with the appearance of the military prison in the middle of their beautiful Bay. Military inmates were enlisted to plant the slopes  in an effort to create a cheerful face for the town.

 

This year, we planted a few Iceland poppies, Papaver nudicaule. These are the bright orange and yellow flowers that are typically seen in early spring.

 

 

 

 

An annual poppy that we tried this year is Papaver ‘Danebrog’. The results so far are quite impressive! A brilliant red with white splotches on the outside of the petals, the plant has reached a height of 4’ so far.

 

An annual poppy in the Prisoner Gardens. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

An annual poppy in the Prisoner Gardens. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Our last poppy is another ‘stop and notice me’ plant. The fried egg looking blossoms of the Matilija poppy, Romneya coulteri, look like they are made from tissue paper. The delicate looking blooms sit at the end of thorny stems of a rather tall shrub. This California native was tough to get started but it is now fully established and is loving its location in the Prisoner Gardens.

Matilija poppy flower looks just like a fried egg. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Matilija poppy flower looks just like a fried egg. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

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Gardening with non-Natives

Earth Day typically involve activities that focus on native plants and restoring habitats, but the day was also an opportunity to demonstrate that gardeners can landscape with drought tolerant non-native plants that are not invasive. Hosting a garden table with Alcatraz Cruises’ Earth Day celebration last week was a chance to highlight plants growing on Alcatraz, that while not native, are extremely well suited to the climate they have been thriving in.

 

From over 200 species of plants that survived the closure of the prison five plants were chosen to be on display. Each of the five plants has different adaptions to coping with drought, wind, poor soil and sun exposure.

 

The first plant always receives a lot of attention – Aeonium arboreum, or hens and chicks as most people call it. This succulent is able to store water in its fleshy leaves, and will drop the lower leaves when water becomes scarce. Producing few seeds, the plant mainly propagates itself by the forming roots along its stem. The roots will grow downwards, seeking any soil to root into. The plant is able to thrive in poor soil; I have even seen a massive clump of aeonium growing out of 5 inches of debris that had accumulated on top of a tunnel entrance.

 

Hens and Chicks. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Hens and Chicks. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Another popular succulent is Persian carpet. This little beauty is coloring the hillsides of the island pink right now. As tiny as the leaves are, they store water and the slightly dimpled leaves reflect light. The ice plant is great for stabilizing poor soils. Although an ice plant, this little guy is not the common invasive ice plant that is often seen along freeways.

 

Nasturtium poking through Persian carpet. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Nasturtium poking through Persian carpet. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

A common garden plant in the 1940s and 50s was Pelargoniums, commonly known as geraniums. Pelargoniums are from the Southern Hemisphere and are from the

Pelargonium quercifolium - Oak leaf geranium. The leaves have a unique fragrance and are slightly sticky. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Pelargonium quercifolium – Oak leaf geranium. The leaves have a unique fragrance and are slightly sticky. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Mediterranean regions of South Africa. Five different cultivars survived on the island. The rough leaves reflect light, as well as the plant will drop its lower leaves when stressed by drought. It is not known exactly how, but the scented leaves of pelargonium are thought to be a survival mechanism.

 

Another survivor is the common garden nasturtium. It is surprising that the fleshy green round leaves are able to cope with the strong winds and lack of water, but these annuals have been self-seeding since they were introduced in 1924. They are able to complete their life cycle by the time water is becoming scarce in the soil.

 

Many visitors are surprised to see Calla lilies

Calla lily. Photo by Shelagh Fritz.

Calla lily. Photo by Shelagh Fritz.

thriving in the gardens. The callas, growing from a rhizome, are able to grow with the rains and then store energy for next year’s growth. The arrow shaped leaves will even funnel water to the roots. As we don’t water our callas, they do go dormant, the green leaves fading to yellow.

 

Growing a garden with just native plants is a wonderful goal, but gardeners can also select suitable plants for their area that are not native. Taking a walk around Alcatraz this month really shows how dramatic creating garden on a bare rock with non-natives can be.

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It’s Glad Time

Most gardeners have a winter pastime of pouring over plant order catalogues, examining each plant and adding it to a wish list. Here in San Francisco, while we do not quite receive the same snowstorms as elsewhere, we do have long nights and look forward to spring.

 

I placed an order for heirloom Gladiolus from Old House Bulbs this past fall and they arrived this week! With their bright pink labels, they looked like bags of candy. I ordered a selection of bulbs that would have been available to gardeners before 1963. The federal prison closed in 1963, and so when choosing heirloom plants, we try to be as authentic as possible.

Bags of gladiolus. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Bags of gladiolus. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Gladiolus flowers were identified in a few historic

An inmate holding a bouquet of cut gladiolus. Photo courtesy of Joseph Simpson.

An inmate holding a bouquet of cut gladiolus. Photo courtesy of Joseph Simpson.

photographs from the 1940s and 1950s, in one photo an inmate is actually holding a whole armful of apricot sprays of flowers. Often, these bouquets were taken to the chapel to decorate the altar, or placed on the dock for resident families to come and take for their own homes.

 

Another photograph shows the blooms standing at the back of a bed in the Prisoner Gardens on the west side of the island. Maybe the inmates were able to order from a catalogue too? Or maybe a guard brought them back to the island to be planted. Not knowing how plants arrived on the island is part of the mystery of gardening on the Rock. At any rate, a great deal of effort was put into obtaining plants to provide beauty.

 

Gladiolus growing along the back of the flower garden in the Prisoner Gardens. Photo courtesy of Joseph Simpson.

Gladiolus growing along the back of the flower garden in the Prisoner Gardens. Photo courtesy of Joseph Simpson.

The gladiolus that I ordered have fun names – Friendship, Carolina Primrose, Dauntless, Bibi, Melodie, Contentment (probably not the best name for being on Alcatraz), Abyssinian (which appears in the Gardens of Alcatraz book), and Boone. These glads will be planted this coming week in the Rose Terrace in the raised bed in front of the greenhouse, where the photo of the inmate holding the cut gladiolus was taken.

 

Last year, our gladiolus had significant rust, so this year we will experiment with treating them with a fungicide and lifting them at the end of the growing season to store them for the winter.

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Pretty Friday

We finally had some rain this week! The light spring showers and fog have really helped the gardens. The gardens were beginning to dry out earlier than usual, even the ferns and moss were beginning to think spring was over.

 

Hearing the fog horn from the bridge, the buoy bell marking ‘little Alcatraz’, and all the seabirds this morning made it just a great day to be working in the Prisoner Gardens on the west side of the island. We also had our faithful crew of volunteers, and joining us this morning was a team from the San Francisco Recreation and Parks. We all worked together to cut back Chasmanthe floribunda on the terraces and admired the view. We cut back Chasmanthe while it is still green to make it easier to break down in our compost.

 

After the group had left, I had a chance to do a little more weeding and a few plants just caught my eye – especially this combination of the Heliotrope arborescens (cherry pie) with Osteospermum (African daisy). The purple centers of the osteospermum match the purple flowers of the heliotrope perfectly.

 

Osteospermum with Heliotrope. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Osteospermum with Heliotrope. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Last week we cut back

Polystichum munitum fronds unfolding. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Polystichum munitum fronds unfolding. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

the native sword ferns, Polystichum munitum and the new fronds are just coming up now. Seeing the new fronds unfurl is pretty cool and it is like an abstract garden art with their fuzzy coils, even each leaflet is curled up.

 

Finishing the day in the rose terrace, the sun was shining and the all the Homeria collina also known as Moraea collina (cape tulip) were in full bloom with the dutch bulb iris ‘Blue Sapphire’.

 

Homeria and dutch iris in the rose terrace. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Homeria and dutch iris in the rose terrace. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The island is already beginning to be sold out a week in advance so I hope the lucky visitors who do have tickets for this weekend come along on our garden tours or at least walk through the gardens to see how pretty this prison island is.

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Stewardship

Spring is no doubt one of the busiest times of the year in any garden. For us, the winter rains seem to be tapering off and the weeding (hopefully) will slow down.  Visitors often comment that they hardly see any weeds in our gardens. This is, in large part, thanks to the crew of dedicated volunteers that come out each week. Many of the volunteers steward a favorite garden area and take great pride in keeping their area looking the best at all times.

2011_April_Rose Terrace_Dutch purple iris and Homeria_SLF photo (1)

Spring blooms of Homeria (cape tulip) and dutch iris ‘Sapphire Beauty’. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

 

In fact, stewarding garden areas has worked out so well, that we are encouraging other volunteers to pick an area. It’s not just weeding that needs to be done – there is a job for everyone, and besides, what other job lets you pick what you want to do?

 

2011_February_Corny Foster in Officers' Row_Terrace 8_Shelagh Fritz photo

Corny weeding oxalis. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The pocket gardens left by the military along the main roadway all have someone to tend them. One volunteer loves to pick out oxalis from a granite wall and encourages lichens and ferns to grow. It’s also a prime spot to talk with visitors. You can almost tell her height by the line of oxalis that is just out of grasp.

 

The compost pile draws its own characters of tough volunteers who faithfully turn the 4’x 4’ x 4’ piles each week and keep on top of the new vegetation debris constantly being added.

 

The rose terrace has another volunteer who focusses on watering by hand each of the roses and the greenhouse, while another volunteer loves to deadhead the roses to keep them blooming for months.

 

Other volunteers have found niches for themselves by pruning ivy off of railings, removing yellow leaves, dead flowers and broken stems from the ivy leaf pelargoniums in the 330’ long planter trough, or sweeping roadways.

 

Stewarding can also be seasonal – for example, as the oxalis finishes growing on the cell house slope, removing dead flowers (deadheading) from geraniums is just starting in other garden areas.

 

Volunteers stewarding the trough planter by removing yellow leaves and spent blossoms. Photo by Fergal Moran.

Volunteers stewarding the trough planter by removing yellow leaves and spent blossoms. Photo by Fergal Moran.

For parents trying to encourage kids to get hooked on gardening, giving the kids one plant that is ‘theirs’ might just be the way to give them not only the responsibility of keeping something alive, but they also get to experience the joy of seeing something that is flourishing because of them.

 

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Fascinating Fasciation

 Chances are, you have seen fasciation on your own garden plants and maybe thought ‘how weird’ and did not think much more about it. Fasciation is a mutation in a plant’s growth habit, which causes the plant to grow flattened, elongated shoots and flower heads that look like many stems compressed together. I recently came across an Aeonium arboreum on Alcatraz that has a branch of flattened growth with many dwarf rosettes growing along the top of the flattened stem.

 

The flattened stem of affected stem compared to the normal round stem of the aeonium. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The flattened stem of affected stem compared to the normal round stem of the aeonium. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

So why does this mutation happen? Geoff Stein submitted an article for the website, Dave’s Gardens, and describes various theories but the precise cause is unknown. A bacterial, fungal or viral infection may cause some genetic mutation and a phytoplasma (a mix of a bacteria and a virus) has been proven to cause the mutation in some species. Of course, chemical and physical trauma are possibilities, though usually that sort of trauma damages the meristem (growth center) in such a way that the plant simply begins to divide, resulting in ‘ordinary’ branching or multiple heads. Perhaps radiation from the sun is another possible mutation cause.  Some plants seem more prone to this mutation at various seasons, so temperature, humidity or heat may have some influence.  Some nutritional deficiencies have been known to lead to cresting mutations (e.g., Zinc deficiency) as well.  Sometimes mutations can occur spontaneously, just a chromosomal malfunction.  

Mutated leaves of this aeonium are smaller than the normal rosette of leaves. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Mutated leaves of this aeonium are smaller than the normal rosette of leaves. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

These mutations are not passed along through seed, but, as Stein notes, there has to be some sort of genetic tendency for these mutations to occur as many species form fasciations fairly commonly while others have never been found to do so.  Succulents and cacti tend to be fasciated quite often. For the number of succulents on the island though, this is the first time we have seen this growth.

Fasciated growth  is not uncommon in other plants – forsythia being one of the more common. Recently, a Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy field staff noticed the mutation happening in poison oak!

Cuttings can be done of the mutated growth and a quick search on websites, show that these mutations can be highly desired. Perhaps we will start a fascinating fasciation garden?

 

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Test Your Knowledge

Upon arriving to Alcatraz, many visitors are surprised at how, well, BEAUTIFUL, the island is. The gardens are a stark contrast to what they were expecting to find – a barren island in the middle of San Francisco Bay that has the world’s most famous prison. Test your knowledge about the gardens with these questions, I bet you learn something new.

 

1.  In 2005, a plant inventory was done of the surviving vegetation on Alcatraz. How many species of plants were found?

A. Less than 50

B. Between 51 and 100

C. Between 101 and 200

D. Over 200

 

2.   True or False – the island has no source of freshwater other than fog drip and rainfall.

 

3.  True or False – all of the island’s soil was imported.

 

4.  True or False – the gardens have plants from every continent except Antarctica.

 

5.  True or False – inmate gardener, Elliot Michener,

Inmate gardener, Elliot Michener. Photo courtesy of J. Simpson.

Inmate gardener, Elliot Michener. Photo courtesy of J. Simpson.

was so attached to the gardens he created during his 9 year stay, that upon his transfer to Leavenworth Prison in Kansas, he requested to come back to Alcatraz to finish his sentence.

 

6.  True or False – today, the garden volunteers have a worm farm in the rose terrace greenhouse.

 

7.  The nasturtiums seen growing on the island today were introduced:

A. 1924 by the California Wildflower and Spring Blossom Society

Nasturtium. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Nasturtium. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

B. A seagull dropped the seeds

C. 2003 when The Garden Conservancy began clearing overgrowth

 

8. Alcatraz Island is 22.5 acres in size. The gardens make up:

A. 500 ft2

B. 1 acre

C. 2 acres

D. 4.5 acres

 

9.  True or False – During the island’s days as a military prison, there was a mule stable on the west lawn.

 

10.  True or False – Penitentiary guards would sometimes fish from the Alcatraz dock. They would use the fish heads to fertilize the island’s roses.

 

11.  True or False – Penitentiary inmates tended flower gardens and would leave buckets of flowers on the dock for guards’ families.

 

12.  The garden restoration began in 2003 and relied heavily on volunteer gardens. As of January 2013, garden volunteers have logged:

A. 1000 hours

B. 10 000 hours

C. 30 000 hours

D. 40 000 hours

 

13. True or False – once you are on the island, the garden tour is free.

 

14. The military and penitentiary encouraged inmates to garden, mainly to give the inmates something to do. A number of greenhouses were constructed on the island to help grow plants. Today, there are 2

The Warden's greenhouse. Photo courtesy of GoGa.

The Warden’s greenhouse. Photo courtesy of GoGa.

greenhouses on the island, but how many greenhouses once stood on the island?

A. 2

B. 4

C. 6

D. 8

 

15.  Today, Alcatraz is a protected sanctuary for many kinds of water birds who return to the island every spring to nest and raise their families. A few of these birds began coming to the island during the 40 years when the gardens became overgrown. Which birds come to the island because the overgrowth provides ideal nesting sites?

A. Seagulls and Brandt’s cormorants

B. Pelicans

C. Snowy egrets and black crowned night herons

D. Pigeon guillemots and penguins

 

16.  True or False – there are still more gardens to restore on the island.

 

17.  True or False – the military had vocational training for inmates to become gardeners.

 

18. The slope in front of the cell house was planted in 1924 to give a friendly look to San Francisco. The slope was restored in 2007 and the Persian carpet iceplant is blooming bright pink once again. The slope can be seen as far away as:

A. As you approach on the ferry

Pink persian carpet showing a cheerful face to San Francisco. Photo courtesy of J. Simpson.

Pink persian carpet showing a cheerful face to San Francisco. Photo courtesy of J. Simpson.

B. Fisherman’s Wharf

C. Crissy Field

D. The Golden Gate Bridge

E. Space

 

19. What is the secret ingredient in our award winning compost?

A. Bird guano

B. Oxalis

C. Anchor Steam hops

D. Love

 

20.  True or False – there is always something blooming in the gardens, regardless of the time of year.

 

 

 

Answers:

1. d; 2. True; 3. True; 4. True; 5. True; 6. True; 7. a; 8. d; 9. True; 10. True; 11. True; 12. d; 13. True; 14. c; 15. c; 16. True; 17. True; 18. d; 19. c; 20. c

 

How did you do?

15-20 correct answers – You should become a docent!

10-14 – Very good!

6-9      – Pretty good.

0-5      – Come join us on a tour!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February Blues

 The February blues on Alcatraz are anything but blah. The range of bluish purple flowers in the gardens is very rich and complements many of the orange and yellow blooming plants.

Just on our small island, there are a number of plants in bloom right now in the same shades.

Echium candicans, pride of Madeira,

Pride of Madeira, Echium candican. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Pride of Madeira, Echium candican. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

has been blooming for over a month now, mainly on the west side of the island where they are loved by hummingbirds. A survivor garden plant, one seed landed by chance in the rose terrace, right alongside another survivor, Muscari

Grape hyacinth. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Grape hyacinth. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

armeniacum, grape hyacinth. Seeing the same shade of purple blue but in drastically different plants adds to the richness of the garden. The seedpods Muscari can be left to stand to add more interest to the garden, plus they also multiply themselves.

Vinca major, periwinkle, is another survivor in bloom now. This common groundcover is often forgotten as it is pretty common to see, and can even spread itself into places you rather it not go. When photographed against yellow lichen on a concrete wall, it really does catch your eye.

Periwinkle. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Periwinkle. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

 

 

 

 

 

Our dutch iris, ones that grow from a bulb instead of a rhizome, are just beginning to flower on the rose terrace. A few original bulbs were found growing in this garden so we planted more of ‘Sapphire Beauty’ in a raised bed in front of the greenhouse. The yellow flame looks great with California poppy and yellow Calendula or daffodils.

Dutch iris 'Sapphire Beauty'. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Dutch iris ‘Sapphire Beauty’. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

A new plant for Alcatraz is the native California lilac, Ceanothus. This shrub has many cultivars and we chose ‘Julia Phelps’, that will hopefully reach its full size of 7′ tall and 9′ wide. The flowers are a dark indigo color and this cultivar is suppose to be one of the best bloomers. We planted it at the top of the cellhouse slope and even with the sparse rain this winter, it is already blooming. Perhaps one negative for this plant is that we are also noticing seagull feathers collecting on the leaves. But, the dark blue flowers will look great with the pink persian carpet.

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Science of the Seasons

What is phenology? Phenology is the study of seasonal or periodic biological events such as plant leaf-out and flowering, insect emergence, and animal migration. Put simply, phenology is the science of the seasonsIn order to assess the effects of climate change on California’s extraordinary biodiversity and natural resources, the California Phenology Project was established in 2010 as a 3 year pilot project. The pilot project is focusing on 7 parks, including the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

 

Corny walking her phenology trail with her clipboard. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Corny walking her phenology trail with her clipboard. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Corny Foster, a garden volunteer, also volunteers with stewardship of Crissy Field, an area just east of the Golden Gate Bridge. A few plants in her area are being monitored as part of the California Phenology Project, and so she thought ‘why aren’t we doing this on Alcatraz’? Alcatraz has 2 of the 5 native plants that are being monitored in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area – California poppy, Eschscholzia californica and coyote bush, Baccharis pilularis. Project wide, over 60 plant species are being monitored. The species were selected based on their ability to address key scientific questions and to inform natural resource management, as well as their ability to engage the public (charisma and easy identification are important!).

Our plants are being monitored for breaking leaf buds, young leaves, flowers, open flowers, pollen release, fruits, ripe fruit and recent fruit drop. Our phenology trail takes about 30 minutes to complete and we are hoping to build a volunteer group to do the twice weekly monitoring. Eventually, we hope to invite school groups out to observe the plants and to build on their school lessons, and to show them that looking closely at plants is FUN!

The checklist of what to look for. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The checklist of what to look for with simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answers. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The island’s environment provides a unique opportunity to study the plants. We will be able to compare our flowering times with plants on the mainland and find out just how much being surrounded by water affects our plants. Plus, Alcatraz does not have any gophers, so our California poppies are never tampered with. The selected plants to be monitored on Alcatraz do not receive irrigation.

Simple to observe and record, phenology offers a way for “citizen scientists” to

A California poppy staked out on the trail. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

A California poppy staked out on the trail. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

learn about the rhythms and natural processes of their local environment while observing directly the important links between the living world and the climate system. If you would like to volunteer to monitor our plants, send an email to info@alcatrazgardens.org.

 

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Aloe arborescens, the tree aloe

As the seabird nesting season is about to get underway, beginning February 1st, there are a few landscape areas that we do one final weeding and tending to the plants, as the gardeners won’t be allowed back in these areas until September.

 

One area the volunteers weeded last week was a section of survivor plants on the west side of the island. The survivor plants include Agave americana, Pelargonium ‘Alphonse Ricard’, Chasmanthe floribunda, and Aloe arborescens. All of these plants are quite happy on their own but a little weeding never hurts!

 

The volunteers weeding the slope of oxalis and mallow. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The volunteers weeding the slope of oxalis and mallow. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The aloe, commonly referred to tree aloe, candelabra plant or Krantz aloe, is a plant that we have been giving some extra attention the past few years. The bush aloe was once a full stand, approximately 20 feet across. But, the weight of all its beauty caused the aloe to collapse in 2006. We had repotted some of the smaller plants and grew them in the greenhouse, transplanting them back when they filled a one-gallon pot.

 

Aloe arborescens. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

Aloe arborescens. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

While we cleared away oxalis and weedy mallow, the original aloe ‘trunk’ could be seen. The trunk had fallen over and was sprouting new plants, just like a nurse log in a forest. A nurse log is very common in woodlands, where an older tree has fallen and as it begins to decompose, seedlings take root.

 

The nurse log in 2011. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The nurse log in 2011. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

 

The nurse log in 2013. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

The nurse log in 2013. Photo by Shelagh Fritz

With the aloe listed in Pam Peirce’s ‘Wildly Successful Plants’, this must be a tough plant, especially to survive on Alcatraz. Native to the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, the aloe was used as plantings on top of earth embankments, creating corrals for livestock. The plant travelled to Europe in the early 1700s with explorers and later arrived in California with the early Spanish settlers. How the plant arrived on Alcatraz is a mystery, but it certainly is a good plant choice. The aloe is thriving in poor, well-drained soil, receives full sun and tolerates the cool coastal summers. The plant also happens to be deer resistant (not that we have that problem), but we do protect it against seagulls!

 

A few of the propagated plants were established along the road that takes visitors through the Prisoner Gardens. We also have a yellow blooming aloe, donated from the Ruth Bancroft Garden that is blooming right now. All of the aloes are great for attracting and feeding hummingbirds.

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